If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
Click here for an important statement on the Coronavirus (COVID-19)
We are available for Telemedicine calls if necessary. Please call the office to request.
Monday, 30 March 2020 00:00

One of the functions of normal blood flow throughout the body is to provide oxygen and nutrients to the muscles and skin. Peripheral artery disease, which is also referred to as PAD, may develop as a result of excess plaque that accumulates in the arteries. This excess of plaque can lead to decreased blood flow. Patients who have this condition may be at risk of developing sores on the feet that can become infected. Research has indicated that people who have PAD are advised to refrain from walking barefoot, wear shoes that fit properly, and examine the feet daily for any redness or sores. Some of the symptoms that are often associated with this ailment can include a heavy feeling in the legs, cramps that develop after walking short distances, and coldness in the lower leg or foot. If you feel you are afflicted with PAD, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat this condition.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

Sesamoiditis may occur when the sesamoid bones in the feet become inflamed. This condition can be incredibly uncomfortable and can cause pain that is typically felt in the ball of the foot. This condition is common among dancers, joggers, those who frequently wear high heels, as well as those who have high-arched feet. Along with feeling pain towards the forefront of the affected foot, you may also notice swelling and redness around the affected area. Custom orthotics can be worn as a means to alleviate pain and reduce pressure. For a proper diagnosis and treatment options, it is suggested that you contact a podiatrist if you feel that you are afflicted with sesamoiditis.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC. Our doctors will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
Thursday, 19 March 2020 00:00

Living with foot pain is hard on your body.  Give us a call and let us find out what's wrong.

Wednesday, 18 March 2020 00:00

The medical condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma typically affects the area between the third and fourth toe. It can occur as a result of a compressed nerve, and may cause severe pain and discomfort. Some of the symptoms that are generally associated with this condition can include a numbing or tingling sensation, and it may hurt to have full range of motion while walking. This ailment can be caused by wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, participating in sporting activities that involve the ball of the foot, or it may develop from previous scar tissue. Moderate relief may be found when the affected foot is elevated. Additionally, it may be beneficial to wear custom-made orthotics, which can help to relieve a portion of the pressure. If you are afflicted with Morton’s neuroma, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Delaware County, LLC. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Springfield, and Upland, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Connect with us